Thrive

Posted on July 21st, 2012 by in Creative Corner

Creativity Corner: The Long Walk

Artist, Loren Talbot, shares her experience in creating this collage: The Long Walk.

This piece entitled The Long Walk was inspired by a book with the same name. It was written by the author, Slavomir Rawicz who was a Polish prisoner locked in a Siberian camp. He and six other’s escaped from the camp and crossed after six months through the Himalayas’ into freedom.

While there has been much discussion in recent years if the acts in the book actually took place or were imagined; the story is one of triumph from imprisonment, physical and mental survival and free will. I made this collage after reading the book. The Himalayas are collaged gears representing the miles the group had traveled and the sun setting symbolized the end of the journey. I added Chinese characters in the piece to acknowledge the ongoing occupation of Tibet as it is hard to think of these mountains without their many layers of history.

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Posted on July 18th, 2012 by in Yoga

Kripalu Yoga Posture Clinic: Triangle

Welcome to the Kripalu Yoga Posture Clinic, week eight! Here, Devarshi Steven Hartman, Dean of the Kripalu School of Yoga, and Jovinna Chan, Assistant Dean, share sound tips to help your yoga Triangle pose soar. These clips can be enjoyed independently or as a series for a complete practice, once they’re all published. Come back every Wednesday for this 12-week series! Enjoy!

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Posted on July 16th, 2012 by in Outside Our Walls, Yoga

Outside Our Walls: Yoga Everywhere

In this series, we hear from recipients of KYTA’s Teaching for Diversity and Rachel Greene Memorial Fund grants, as they change the world one posture at a time.

Melinda Atkins, Guest Blogger

Introducing yoga to a group of middle-school students is an enlightening experience, especially after teaching yoga full-time to high-school students. Middle-school minds are more impressionable, and their bodies more malleable, than those of their older counterparts. Eager to learn discipline, most are still children who want to be grown, and the success the practice rewards them with along the way encourages their self-confidence.

Today’s student typically suffers from poor posture, poor eating habits, and poor self-esteem. For middle schoolers, with an overt awareness of their changing bodies, classroom performance is hindered. With surges and shifts in hormones, along with excessive technological stimuli, students are hard-pressed when it comes to focus. This ultimately causes stress and, for many—especially those struggling to assimilate—failure.

Years of teaching high-school English has instilled in me an empathetic view of the physical, mental, and emotional demands involved in adolescent development. Armed with a master’s degree in Education and an understanding of the impact a pedagogic approach to yoga would have on adolescents, I created a semester-long yoga course and taught it as part of a high-school curriculum.

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Posted on July 15th, 2012 by in Moment of Quiet

Moment of Quiet

Every Sunday, you’ll find a space to enjoy guided meditation, a piece of music, an enticing image, or video that inspires calm. This week, enjoy this tranquil shot of sunrise on the lake.

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Posted on July 11th, 2012 by in Yoga

Kripalu Yoga Posture Clinic: Warrior Two

Welcome to the Kripalu Yoga Posture Clinic, week seven! Here, Devarshi Steven Hartman, Dean of the Kripalu School of Yoga, and Jovinna Chan, Assistant Dean, share sound tips to help your yoga practice soar. These clips can be enjoyed independently or as a series for a complete practice, once they’re all published. Come back every Wednesday for this 12-week series! Enjoy!

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Posted on July 8th, 2012 by in Moment of Quiet

Moment of Quiet

“Growth can only be gradual. The seed that is sown today does not sprout into a tree the next day. It does so only in the course of time, at its own pace, and by its own order.” —Swami Kripalu

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Posted on July 4th, 2012 by in Yoga

Kripalu Yoga Posture Clinic: Warrior One

Welcome to the Kripalu Yoga Posture Clinic, week six! Here, Devarshi Steven Hartman, Dean of the Kripalu School of Yoga, and Jovinna Chan, Assistant Dean, share sound tips to help your yoga practice soar. These clips can be enjoyed independently or as a series for a complete practice, once they’re all published. Come back every Wednesday for this 12-week series! Enjoy!

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Posted on July 1st, 2012 by in Moment of Quiet

Take a Moment of Quiet

“Serve with a full heart. By making others happy, you make yourself happy. The key to your heart lies hidden in the heart of another.” —Swami Kripalu

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Posted on June 30th, 2012 by in Healthy Living, Medical Insights

Get Happy: Lessons from the New Field of Positive Psychology

Is happiness possible for all of us? How do we take the first step?

Cheryl Kain, Guest Blogger

Because the Constitution declares our right to pursue happiness, contentment can seem, for many Americans, like a birthright. At the same time, the quest for happiness can feel like herding cats—elusive and frustrating. We’re failures if we aren’t “happy” all the time—that’s why scores of books are written promising the secrets to happiness. But the search for happiness as an aggressive imperative can have the opposite effect, especially since happiness is relative for many people, including those facing poverty, health problems, or deep despair. The questions become: Can we ever truly achieve happiness? And could there be a set of universal prescriptions for getting there?

Teacher and author Tal Ben-Shahar, PhD, a pioneer in the field of Positive Psychology and author of Being Happy: You Don’t Have to be Perfect to Lead a Richer, Happier Life, says the number-one predictor of well-being is the time we spend with people we care about and who care about us. “Latin Americans are happier than North Americans, because of the emphasis on relationships,” he says. “Friends and family play a much more central role in their lives.” This certainly rings true for me: In my own life, I have been far happier in my thirties and forties than when I was a singing-career-obsessed twentysomething. According to Gail Sheehy’s New York Times bestseller, Passages, I am a “deferred nurturer” and, admittedly, I did not value relationships as much as I did getting ahead in those earlier years. Smack dab in early midlife, relationships trump all for me now. My daily relational experiences, whether with my bestie or the grocery clerk, far outshine the pleasure of those long-ago pipe dreams.

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Posted on June 28th, 2012 by in Yoga

Turning Point: Julie Sorichetti

Julie Sorichetti, the first Yoga Ed.TM trainer in Canada, has successfully delivered the Yoga Ed. curriculum and Tools for Teachers program to the Ontario Physical and Health Education Association, the Ontario Database for Daily Physical Activity, and the Ministry of Education’s Registry of Bullying Prevention Programs. A mother of three, Julie is a child and youth worker as well as a certified Kripalu Yoga teacher and DansKinetics instructor.

Q Describe what you do in 15 words or less.

A My mission is to see that all children have the tools and resources to help them through any situation.

Q Tell us about a turning point in your life.

A When I was 20, I was a child and youth worker in a group home outside my hometown in Canada. I would see the in-house doctors prescribe medication for all these young people, who were constantly questioning their diagnoses and prescriptions. I found myself questioning this as well. I felt there had to be more than medication to help kids, youth, and also adults. It was around that time that I found myself in a yoga class. Yoga wasn’t a prescription, it was a solution.

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