Thrive

Posted on November 28th, 2012 by in Healthy Living

Turning Point: Barbara Biziou

Barbara Biziou, author of The Joy of Ritual and The Joys of Family Rituals, integrates her extensive knowledge of global spiritual practices, rituals, psychology, and business into her coaching and speaking practice. She is a Huffington Post blogger and has been featured in the New York Times, Oprah.com, PsychologyToday.com, Harper’s Bazaar, and more. www.joyofritual.com

Q Describe what you do in 15 words or less.

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Posted on November 27th, 2012 by in Life Lessons

The Politics of Emotion

In the days after the election, millions of people around the world watched as President Obama delivered a heartfelt—and teary—speech to his campaign staff. “What you guys have done,” he said to them, wiping away tears with his finger, “means that the work that I’m doing is important.” It was both surprising and moving to see a man in a position traditionally known for coolness—under pressure always—overcome with such visible emotion.

In fact, emotions came up a lot throughout the election. Some of the most prominent issues were ones that spoke to us, our lives and our beliefs, very personally: our right to control our bodies, our right to marry whomever we want. We saw many tender moments between the candidates—though some more tender than most. Both during and after the election, the emotional vulnerability we saw from Obama far surpassed that of his opponent, making us wonder: Could emptions have contributed to Obama’s win?

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Posted on November 26th, 2012 by in Words from the Wise

Stumbling Blocks, Stepping Stones

J. L. Johnson, guest blogger

When Edmund Hillary set foot on the summit of Mount Everest in 1953, it was his greatest feat: a first ascent that would forever link his name, along with that of his Sherpa guide, Tenzing Norgay, to the world’s highest peak. But it wasn’t his greatest challenge. That would come in 1975, when Hillary’s wife and 16-year-old daughter were killed in a plane crash. “It changed everything,” he told Time magazine. “My life disappeared.”

Hillary did eventually remarry, and carried on with vital environmental and humanitarian work in his beloved Nepal. When he died in 2008, it was as a climbing legend who had conquered the unconquerable—but also as a husband and father who’d spent years tackling a much more personal obstacle.

Whether it’s loss of a job or loss of a loved one, accident or illness, sooner or later we all find something daunting that is standing in our life’s path: An obstacle. A roadblock. Or, as suggested by Kripalu Healthy Living faculty member Maria Sirois, PsyD, a mountain: something that can seem insurmountable but can help us learn to value the climbing process itself and give us greater perspective as we rise.

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Posted on November 25th, 2012 by in Moment of Quiet

Moment of Quiet

“Just for a few moments, simply sit, breathe comfortably (close your eyes if you’d like), and allow yourself to be at ease. Stop reading, stop all activity, and notice what happens.”—Stephen Cope

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Posted on November 24th, 2012 by in Life Lessons

Three Tips to Succeed in Your Life’s Work

Tama Kieves, guest blogger

You may not know what you’d love to do. Or you may be in the thick of living your passion, but want to take your dream to the heights of wild success. The path is the same. It’s about choosing love instead of fear.

Stay true to your desires. Please don’t make them “practical.” This is an inspired path, not a “reasonable” one. Ignore the experts and listen to your genius. Express what you want, not what you think you can have. Undiluted desire excites you. When you’re engaged, you’re firing on all cylinders. When you’re inspired, you’re unstoppable.

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Posted on November 21st, 2012 by in Outside Our Walls

A Soldier Gives Herself Permission to Be Human

Audra Jamai White, guest blogger

I spent three years on active duty with the U.S. Army, including one year in Iraq, and now I’m  in the Massachusetts National Guard. I’ve always strived to be a “super soldier”—perfectionism and being in control were what fueled me. Towards the end of my deployment, I started experiencing depression and anxiety. I’d spend 12 hours on duty and then I’d spend 12 hours in my room, crying. When I went to see the medics for a sports injury they reached out to me and helped, through providing medication and therapy.

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Posted on November 20th, 2012 by in Healthy Living

Can Having Friends Help Ease Physical Pain?

A recent study conducted by researchers at Ohio State University and presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience seemed to prove that friendship has benefits beyond the emotional. In studying treatments for peripheral neuropathy, a pain and numbness of the hands and feet that’s a side effect of diabetes and one of the most common chronic diseases in the United States, researchers found that lab mice paired with a cage-mate experienced far less pain from nerve damage than those who were caged alone. Mice who had “friends” had higher thresholds for pain; they also experienced reductions in inflammation. The lonely mice were just lonely.

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Posted on November 18th, 2012 by in Moment of Quiet

Moment of Quiet

“The nectar in the heart of an individual is not for himself. It is for others.”—Swami Kripalu  

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