Kripalu Kitchen

Enjoy Kripalu Recipes and culinary adventures.

Posted on February 8th, 2013 by in Kripalu Kitchen

Kripalu House Dressing

The Kripalu House Dressing has been a guest favorite for years. Enjoy it over salads or steamed vegetables. Here, John Bagnulo, PhD, MPH, discusses the nutritional benefits of sesame tahini, a star ingredient in the Kripalu House Dressing: Sesame tahini provides an excellent source of copper—a trace mineral critical for the body’s production of its […]

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Posted on February 1st, 2013 by in Kripalu Kitchen

Kripalu Chai

Chai is the word for tea in many languages, so when we have plain tea we are technically drinking chai. Of course, that means the phrase “chai tea” is redundant. What we Westerners refer to as chai is actually masala chai, meaning spiced tea.
 As with most recipes that are enjoyed in various regions throughout […]

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Posted on January 25th, 2013 by in Kripalu Kitchen

Kripalu Recipe: Eggs Over Chorizo Spinach

This delicious breakfast meal can be enjoyed at any time of day. Poached Eggs over Chorizo Spinach Serves 2. 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon curry 1 teaspoon paprika ½ teaspoon cumin ½ teaspoon ground ginger ½ cup large diced onion ½ teaspoon jalapeño pepper ¼ cup sliced or crumbled chorizo (or spicy vegetarian sausage) […]

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Posted on December 28th, 2012 by in Kripalu Kitchen, Nutrition

The Nutritional Benefits of Grains

Grains have a wealth of benefits to offer, from fiber to plant proteins to phytonutrients and B vitamins. There is a caveat, however. You can only reap these benefits if you’re eating whole grains.

When grains are refined (a process in which the outer bran and inner germ are removed), they can be made into a wide variety of cheap foods that will last almost indefinitely, but deliver few nutrients. Refined grains act more like sugar in the body, which may make them easy to overeat. But as you make the switch to whole grains—and become more attuned to what real foods taste like—you can savor the fullness of a whole grain right down to the flavor of its germ. Your body, and your taste buds, will thank you.

You may have heard a lot about gluten lately, the protein responsible for the wonderful chewy texture of breads and other baked goods. It’s true that many people are sensitive to gluten, which has helped spark a deep exploration of gluten-free grains like millet and amaranth, and alternative sources for flour, like coconuts and garbanzo beans. But for the majority of us who digest gluten well, wheat, rye, and other whole grains with gluten remain a wonderfully healthful choice.

With a bit of inspiration and a willingness to get creative, it’s easy to tune into the allure of whole and gluten-free grains, and discover the ones you love best.

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Posted on December 21st, 2012 by in Kripalu Kitchen

Food for the Soul

Food is life. It not only provides nutrients for our bodies, but it can also bestow love and vitality—prana—to our entire being. The holiday season is a perfect opportunity to offer our love to friends, family, and community by infusing the food we make and share with gratitude and good wishes (and to make Kripalu’s Pumpkin-Chocolate Pie!)

In many families, when we gather at the table we begin by saying grace, an expression of gratitude for the life our food provides, and a blessing that honors our guests. The practice of saying grace not only gives voice to our appreciation, but also offers us the chance to harmonize with others and with the food we eat. Pausing before we eat to experience our food through the senses supports digestion. This cephalic (meaning “in the head”) digestion actually triggers the flow of digestive juices and prepares the body to receive food.

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Posted on December 7th, 2012 by in Kripalu Kitchen

Healthy Holiday Cookies

This holiday cookie recipe offers a perfect batter for healthy treats, depending on what ingredients you like to add. Versatile and Yummy Cookies Makes 2–3 dozen, depending on the size you like. Cream together: 1/2 pound Earth Balance vegan spread (or unsalted butter if you prefer) 1 cup Sucanat (dark cane sugar) or another organic […]

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Posted on November 30th, 2012 by in Kripalu Kitchen

Food and Mood

Did you know that your brain is a reflection of the nutrients it receives from
 the biochemical information (food) you feed it? Your brain needs nourishment and whether you are upbeat or feeling blue is strongly influenced by how your “second brain” (your digestive tract) digests and absorbs the “information” you are eating. Thus, your mood is a mirror not only of what you eat but also how you digest!

Here are five quick nutrition tips to boost your mood and lift your spirit:

1. Nourish your “mood-cell membranes” with healthy fats such as avocado, wild fatty fish (sardines, wild salmon, or black cod), nuts, seeds, olives, coconut, and smart oils like extra-virgin olive oil.

2. “B-happy” by including whole foods such as beans, dark, leafy green vegetables, and whole grains rich in B-vitamins in your diet.

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Posted on November 16th, 2012 by in Ayurveda, Kripalu Kitchen

Breakfast, Ayurveda-Style

Even if you don’t consider yourself to be a morning person, there’s still much to love about those first few moments after you roll out of bed: In their stillness you can get ready to step into the day by organizing your thoughts, assessing your needs, and—when it comes to breakfast—nourishing your whole self.

As we’re all unique individuals and our bodies call for different things, there isn’t a formula for a breakfast that suits everyone. Instead, starting the day off right means understanding your body and digestion, and choosing what works for you. This tuning in is at the heart of what we teach at Kripalu, which can help point the way toward a breakfast that’s balanced with you in mind:

1. Heed your hunger. Not everyone can eat like a lumberjack first thing in the morning, so prepare the right-size meal for your body type. From the Ayurvedic perspective, for instance, those with more delicate constitutions (vata types) should have a warming but light meal, like simple hot cereal, while hardier folks who wake up hungry (pitta types) can handle things like eggs, nuts and seeds, and fruit.

2. Fresh is best. We all know the best breakfast comes from our own kitchens—so look for whole foods (grains, fruits, and vegetables) that you can easily prepare for yourself each morning to optimize their freshness. Meat, eggs, and dairy may also have their place on the breakfast table, but only if they arrive fresh from a trusted local source.

3. Stay on schedule. Get into the habit of having your breakfast at a regular time. The body tends to get attuned to things, and if you eat at 6:00 am one day and 10:00 am the next, that can throw off your digestive rhythms. (But you don’t need to eat the same thing every day. In fact, Ayurveda encourages eating seasonally, which ensures an ever-changing lineup of fruits and vegetables.)

4. Savor every bite. Ayurveda teaches that being in tune with your meal—from selecting and preparing it to quietly sitting with it and appreciating it—feeds far more than just your body. Breakfast is an ideal time to explore this practice, and discover that the more you create consciousness around what you’re putting into your body, the stronger and healthier your whole body-mind-spirit complex becomes.

 

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