Tag Archives: acceptance
Posted on July 1st, 2014 by in Conscious Living, Kripalu Video

Balancing Energy and Awareness

The essence of the Kripalu approach is about balancing energy and awareness. Jonathan Foust (Sudhir) guides us in a simple moment of reflection. How can we breathe, relax, feel, watch, and allow in our daily lives?

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Posted on February 20th, 2014 by in Conscious Living

The Dalai Lama on a Snow Day

This year, New England, like much of the country, has been pummeled by snow. And that means snow days for our kids. Which is magical. I remember snow days fondly. Sleeping in. Sledding. Snow men and snow forts. Cocoa and popcorn by the fire. But what about poor mom and dad? There’s the magic, yes. […]

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Posted on October 24th, 2013 by in Wake-Up Call

An Excerpt from May I Be Happy: A Memoir of Love, Yoga, and Changing My Mind

by Cyndi Lee An excerpt from May I be Happy: A Memoir of Love, Yoga, and Changing My Mind. Every day I meet a woman who tells me how much she loves my gray hair and how much she wants to let her own hair go gray. She says that she thinks I am so […]

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Posted on October 15th, 2013 by in Conscious Living

The Path of Radical Acceptance

By Tara Brach Mohini was a regal white tiger who lived for many years at the Washington DC National Zoo. For most of those years her home was in the old lion house—a typical twelve-by-twelve-foot cage with iron bars and a cement floor. Mohini spent her days pacing restlessly back and forth in her cramped […]

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Posted on August 26th, 2013 by in Wake-Up Call

Right Where You’re Supposed To Be

A few years ago, I moved from Massachusetts to Oregon. I had convinced myself that, in order to find happiness, I first needed to find a better place to live. Though I didn’t realize it at the time, I was setting myself up for failure. Settling into a new city was hard work, not to […]

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Posted on March 18th, 2013 by in Words from the Wise

Why Failing Is Good for You

Life lessons on the yogic path by Jennifer Mattson, guest blogger “If you’re not failing, you’re not trying anything.” —Woody Allen Nobody likes to fail. But whether it’s falling out of a headstand in yoga class, or trying a new recipe that ends up in the garbage, failure is inevitable—and it’s how we learn. We […]

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Posted on March 16th, 2013 by in Conscious Living

There’s Weather Up Ahead

by Laura Didyk Travel and I do not have the best relationship. I love point A. And I love the experience of point B. I’m just not that fond of the trip from one to the other. A large part of the conflict is rooted in my lifelong susceptibility to motion sickness. On a bad […]

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Posted on January 24th, 2013 by in Nutrition, Relationships

The Nourishment of Connection

Susan Abbattista, guest blogger This is a story about two women, a rebel, and a raisin. 
The first woman, an accomplished writer and arts aficionado, is quite lovely. She has the kind of rare beauty that inadvertently draws attention from men and women alike. Woman One moves through life with grace and ease, frequently hosting […]

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Posted on October 27th, 2012 by in Wake-Up Call, Words from the Wise

Self-Sufficient Yogi?

The other day at the end of a vinyasa yoga class I did my usual thing of plopping down and gearing up for Savasana with no blanket or sweater to get warm and cozy. Being in a large, chilly room, I sensed that I might need extra warmth but paid no mind. The teacher, Andrew, prompted us to “Take this time to allow the hard work to land, and nurture your self in resting pose.” Upon hitting the deck and doing my utmost to actually get comfortable—doing a brief body scan to relax myself—I lay there wondering why my need to be self-sufficient had, yet again, left me bare-skinned and frigid, trying to relax my shivering bones into Corpse pose.

Being somewhat small in stature, and a good-natured vata/pitta, my tendency is to be high energy and cold most of the time. Andrew started to walk around the room, his soothing voice gently guiding the group into a restful state, and asked anyone who might want a blanket to raise their hand. I pondered his offer and observed myself as I refused to raise my hand, even though I was chilly and unable to settle comfortably into Savasana.

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Posted on October 8th, 2012 by in Yoga

The Alchemy of a Dirty Yogini

Dirt · y [adj.] Appearing as if soiled; dark-colored; dingy; murky.

Pu · ri · fied [verb] 1. To rid of impurities; cleanse. 2. To rid of foreign of objectionable elements. 3. To free from sin, guilt, or other defilement.

Mud surrounded the house where I grew up in a small village in Singapore. I spent many hours walking, playing, and daydreaming along dirt roads. My mom used to make me wash my hands and feet before I could eat or sleep and often yelled when I got myself dirty again. So at a young age, I began to form a judgment about being dirty and clean. Later, in my adult life, that judgment transformed into an invisible quest to be pure, to be good, and to be rid of stains in character.

I was always fascinated with martial arts. Growing up with two brothers and three other cousin-brothers, I watched a lot of kung fu films from Hong Kong where heros and heroines flew through the trees, defeating villains and restoring justice. I loved seeing how the body could quickly assume delicate yet powerful postures and defy gravity with leaps and somersaults. I especially admired the power and beauty that the women possessed. It seemed as though their diligent practices purified their characters—from weakness and doubt to strength and confidence.

When I was 14, I stumbled across a book filled with yoga poses. Fascinated by how flexible the people in the pictures looked, I began imitating them. Fusing martial arts and yoga, I improvised movement flows to demonstrate the sharpness and flexibility of my body. Through the flow, I would relive the feelings that I had when I watched kung fu movies—a sense of accomplishment, transformation, and purification.

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