Tag Archives: anxiety
Posted on April 12th, 2014 by in Healthy Living

Eight Things You Need To Know About Sleep

Although we spend about one-third of our lives asleep, most people still don’t know how to get a good night’s rest and how important it is. Sleep is a good indicator of someone’s overall health says Susan B. Lord, MD, an integrative family physician who teaches the Healthy Living program Transforming Stress at Kripalu. “If […]

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Posted on April 9th, 2014 by in Medical Insights, Yoga

Yoga for Your Health

Many of us have experienced the immediate results of practicing yoga: less stress and a sense of calm. But what you might not know is that regular practice could yield long-term heath benefits. Research from the National Institute of Health (NIH) suggests that practicing yoga, along with regular exercise, can help relieve back pain, high […]

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Posted on September 4th, 2013 by in Conscious Living

Mindfulness for A Happier, Healthy Brain—and Life

Dr. Dan Siegel, a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, has taken the Buddhist practice of mindfulness, or awareness, and tied it to the science of the brain. As a medical student, Dan found his professors taught medicine as if the mind didn’t exist. Frustrated by the lack of integration in […]

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Posted on July 23rd, 2013 by in Ayurveda, Healthy Living

Healing Anxiety and Depression: An Ayurvedic Perspective

by John Douillard John Douillard has been teaching Ayurvedic medicine, natural health, fitness, and nutrition for 19 years and has trained more than 2,000 Western doctors in Ayurvedic medicine. In this article, he discusses depression and anxiety from an Ayurvedic perspective, with a focus on the koshas (which translates from Sanskrit as “sheaths”), described in […]

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Posted on July 19th, 2012 by in Healthy Living, Life Lessons, Medical Insights

What, us worry? Better than anyone.

In his new memoir,Monkey Mind, Daniel Smith describes a life spent in near- constant panic. He’d have recurring nightmares about premature death. He’d wrestle over the decision between ketchup and barbecue sauce. He’d sweat, a lot. In Monkey Mind—the title comes from the Buddhist term meaning “unsettled, restless”—Smith, now mostly recovered though still no stranger to the panic attack, uses humor and blunt-force honesty to describe what is an ever-present, and very American, condition: worry.

These days, everyone’s a worrier. Nearly one in five Americans suffer from an anxiety disorder. If there were an international war of worriers, we’d be winning: According to a recent World Health Organization study, 31 percent of Americans are likely to suffer from an anxiety issue at some point in their lives. Compare that to second-place Colombia, where the anxious top out at 25.3 percent. Even those in developing countries are less likely to fret: According to the 2002 World Mental Health Survey, people in developing-world countries are up to five times less likely to show clinically significant anxiety levels than Americans. Until, that is, they move here.

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