Tag Archives: coffee
Posted on September 5th, 2013 by in Healthy Living

The Sleep-Exercise Link

We’ve all been there: tossing and turning in the middle of the night, watching the minutes on the clock creep ever so slowly forward as we ache for least four or five hours of shut-eye before we have to start the day. It’s agony but, for insomniacs, it’s all too commonplace. You might think the […]

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Posted on July 19th, 2013 by in Ayurveda

5 Ayurvedic Rules for Coffee Drinkers

Shannon Sexton, guest blogger Coffee: Is it good for you or bad for you? Last month, the New York Times Magazine reported that by drinking moderate amounts of coffee, you may reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, dementia, and certain types of cancer—and even, perhaps, live longer. Yet evidence also suggests that coffee […]

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Posted on September 3rd, 2012 by in Ayurveda, Medical Insights

Aging Gracefully Through Ayurveda

It’s possible—really!

We’re a nation obsessed with youth. Even if you’re not actively trying to look like you did 10 years ago (or even one year ago), chances are you want to at least feel, and possibly think, younger. Who doesn’t?

“There seems to be a point where people realize that their previously youthful bodies—and minds—are changing, and they want to get back to where they were,” says Hilary Garivaltis, Dean of the Kripalu School of Ayurveda. That’s normal. What isn’t normal—or needn’t be—is the notion that aging has to be filled with inevitable aches and pains. “We shouldn’t expect that we’ll get old and decrepit and that our bodies should hurt,” says Hilary. “We don’t need to suffer inordinately. That’s not necessarily the reality of aging.” Not according to Ayurveda, anyway.

The truth is that our bodies do break down as we get older—that’s fact. As the synovial fluid in the joints starts to wear thin, our bodies become more brittle, causing friction and pain. Bones, joints, and organs are more delicate. In Ayurveda, this also means an excess of vata, the dosha that governs movement in the body. Too much vata can mean dry

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