Tag Archives: community
Posted on July 2nd, 2014 by in Meditation, Yoga

Why It Took Me 10 Years to Chant Om

by Jennifer Lang When I first began practicing yoga almost two decades ago, there was little to no chanting in class. On a rare occasion, a teacher led a call-and-response or an “om.” Class after class, year after year, I bowed out. With my eyes closed, I sat and listened. Part of me envied my […]

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Posted on January 28th, 2014 by in Yoga

Why Yoga Increases Feelings of Connection

While many people turn to yoga to reduce stress, an equal number go to yoga class in order to experience a greater sense of connection—with themselves and with each other. We come in to class feeling separate, disconnected, even resentful (Why did she put her mat so close to mine?). We leave smiling, warmed by […]

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Posted on December 15th, 2013 by in Conscious Living, Yoga

Yoga and the Year of the Selfie

There’s been a lot of talk this past week about President Barack Obama’s selfie at a memorial for Nelson Mandela. That moment, now frozen in time, shows Obama, Denmark’s prime minister Helle Thorning Schmidt, and her British counterpart, David Cameron, posing like three giddy teenagers while first lady Michelle Obama appeared to scowl off to […]

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Posted on June 11th, 2013 by in Relationships, Studies, News, and Trends

The Science of Love

Love—it’s the supreme human emotion. Babies need it to survive, it can improve brain function and health, and it’s even essential for animals (one study showed that rats that were licked more often by their mothers grew up to be calmer and more curious than their less-pampered counterparts). Love may feel more like magic than […]

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Posted on April 10th, 2013 by in Wake-Up Call

One Dish at a Time

A Kripalu volunteer practices being in the moment. I’ve never felt so serene and relaxed as I did the first time I came to Kripalu, for an R&R retreat. I felt at peace in a way I hadn’t for a very long time. While I was there, something pertaining to the Volunteer Program kept presenting […]

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Posted on December 23rd, 2012 by in Moment of Quiet

A Holiday Moment of Quiet

“Only love can bring unity and remove the separation between all living beings. Only love purifies the body and mind.”—Swami Kripalu

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Posted on December 19th, 2012 by in Life Lessons

Navigating the Darkness—Self-Care and Connection in the Wake of Tragedy

How can we, as mindful people, make our way through this time of senseless and unimaginable loss? Here, Aruni Nan Futuronsky, Kripalu Senior Life Coach, shares some ways we can all seek solace and cultivate connection in the wake of the recent tragedy in Newtown, Connecticut.

Renew your gratitude for what is. Take a few minutes today to appreciate what you have in your life: Speak your gratitude to others. Savor the love that is present. Enjoy and appreciate your children. We live in the illusion of permanence. Life, by definition, is impermanent. By becoming more aware of what is, by savoring it more, perhaps some meaning might emerge from this tragedy.

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Posted on November 26th, 2012 by in Words from the Wise

Stumbling Blocks, Stepping Stones

J. L. Johnson, guest blogger

When Edmund Hillary set foot on the summit of Mount Everest in 1953, it was his greatest feat: a first ascent that would forever link his name, along with that of his Sherpa guide, Tenzing Norgay, to the world’s highest peak. But it wasn’t his greatest challenge. That would come in 1975, when Hillary’s wife and 16-year-old daughter were killed in a plane crash. “It changed everything,” he told Time magazine. “My life disappeared.”

Hillary did eventually remarry, and carried on with vital environmental and humanitarian work in his beloved Nepal. When he died in 2008, it was as a climbing legend who had conquered the unconquerable—but also as a husband and father who’d spent years tackling a much more personal obstacle.

Whether it’s loss of a job or loss of a loved one, accident or illness, sooner or later we all find something daunting that is standing in our life’s path: An obstacle. A roadblock. Or, as suggested by Kripalu Healthy Living faculty member Maria Sirois, PsyD, a mountain: something that can seem insurmountable but can help us learn to value the climbing process itself and give us greater perspective as we rise.

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