Tag Archives: compassion
Posted on June 10th, 2013 by in Yoga

Imagining Change: The Power of Visualization

Change is a fact of life. Even if we take no steps to improve our lives, we’ll still grow older. Time will march forward. The question is whether we’ll move in a direction that leads somewhere we want to go or somewhere we don’t. So often, we think that if we want to experience this […]

read →
Posted on May 20th, 2013 by in Conscious Living

Inner Listening

Danna Faulds, guest blogger I’ve always had an affinity for the idea of a “still, small voice” within, a form of inner guidance that requires vigilance in order to hear its whisperings. The fact that it is both “still” and “small” suggests that I have to lean in, be intimate with that voice, and listen […]

read →
Posted on March 24th, 2013 by in Moment of Quiet

Moment of Compassion

Take a moment to pause, to breathe, and to exhale into the day. Let this pause permit you to hold compassion for yourself and for others. As we let go and head into a new week, set your intention for self-care, connection, and patience.

read →
Posted on February 12th, 2013 by in Meditation

10 Ways to Deepen Your Loving-Kindness Practice

Sharon Salzberg, guest blogger To soften and open your heart to others is to lead a truly fulfilling life. In this excerpt from her book Real Happiness: The Power of Meditation, leading meditation teacher Sharon Salzberg provides 10 simple tips for cultivating a loving-kindness meditation practice. Think of kindness as a strength, not as a […]

read →
Posted on February 4th, 2013 by in Healthy Living

Developing Resiliency From Within

We often get caught up in thinking about what’s not working or what needs improving in our lives, especially when we face difficulties. This piece invites us to look within for hidden treasures and discover the amazing gifts we already have. Who can we become when we are at our most vulnerable? How do we […]

read →
Posted on December 11th, 2012 by in Meditation

‘Tis the Season to Meditate

Forget about enjoying the holidays: More and more, the majority of us just want to make it through. Which is why a meditation practice—proven to counter stress, beat depression and illness, keep energy levels up, and help encourage better sleep—can come in especially handy this time of year. The best part: You don’t need to invest a lot of time or commitment (and, unlike most everything else this season, it’s totally free). Angela Wilson, MA, Manager of Evidence-Based Yoga Curriculum for Kripalu’s Institute for Extraordinary Living, offers the following tips for practicing on-the-go mindfulness: no quiet room, dimmed lights, or mat required.

read →

Permission to Practice

Let me simply say that I didn’t just fall off the mat. Recently, confronted with life on life’s terms, I plummeted, plunged, and wildly tumbled, losing all foothold to the practices that give me perspective and trust. There is good news in this tale though I found my way back relatively quickly. But, in this breach, I endured much self-inflicted struggle and pain.

This story is canine-related. My dogs, Lucy Kay Doodle and Zac Joey Doodle, are gifts of love and growth for me. In their fuzzy, larger-than-life Muppet-ness, they bring me such lessons.They are shiny mirrors into which I see my behavior, recognize my strengths and growth, and see beyond my old patterns of limited thinking. Simply put, my dogs are my teachers. They help me grow.

read →
Posted on October 10th, 2012 by in Healthy Living, Studies, News, and Trends

Cancer Prevention

It’s a lot simpler than we think.

At the Union for International Cancer Control’s recent World Cancer Congress,Washington University School of Medicine researcher Graham Colditz, PD, DrPH, reported that more than 50 percent of cancer could be prevented if we implemented certain “lifestyle changes,” including quitting smoking and avoiding obesity.

Seems somewhat obvious, right? Maybe, maybe not. Although we read enough to know that eating right, exercising, and minimizing our exposure to known toxins (cigarettes among them) can limit our risk of developing cancer, most of us don’t necessarily believe it. “Many people are still under the impression that most cancer is genetic,” says Susan B. Lord,MD, a faculty member in Kripalu Healthy Living programs. “But the real figure is actually five percent.” That is, five percent of cancers have strong genetic ties, and the rest are related to environment and lifestyle. This means that the disease is far more preventable than we tend to think it is. In fact, Dr. Colditz estimated that improvement in diet could reduce cancer incidence by 50 percent, and increases in physical activity could reduce cancer incidence by as much as 85 percent, in five to 20 years.

read →