Tag Archives: digestion
Posted on August 15th, 2013 by in Ayurveda

Five Ayurvedic Tips for Vegans

By Shannon Sexton, guest blogger Thinking about going vegan? Or already committed? Whether you’re ditching dairy for health reasons, or because you want to practice the yama ahimsa (nonviolence), you may want to consider applying Ayurvedic principles to your diet to stay healthy and balanced. “I love Ayurveda because it looks at each individual and […]

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Posted on August 5th, 2013 by in Ayurveda

Dosha Notions: Pitta in Balance

Erin Casperson, Kripalu School of Ayurveda Intern As August rolls on, pitta aggravation is in full force for many of us. The hot, moist/oily, light, spreading, penetrating, and pungent qualities of the summer season have settled into the body and mind for many of us, creating dis-ease. This is especially true if your constitution is […]

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Posted on July 13th, 2013 by in Ayurveda

The Season of Pitta

Erin Casperson, Kripalu School of Ayurveda Intern According to Ayurveda, India’s system of traditional medicine, each season has its own group of qualities, and each quality has its antidote. Ayurvedic technology is based on being in relationship to yourself and the environment through the lens of these qualities. The changing of the seasons gives us […]

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Posted on July 12th, 2013 by in Kripalu Kitchen, Nutrition

Kripalu Recipe: Thai Three-Melon Soup

Acid-Base Balance Naturally sweet summer dishes are filled with healthy fiber and other nutrients. But they have another nutritional benefit, too: they contribute to acid-alkaline balance. The acid-alkaline (or acid-base) principle has been gaining ground in the scientific community as an important guideline for preventive health. Maintaining a healthy acid-alkaline balance is thought to support […]

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Posted on July 3rd, 2013 by in Healthy Living, Nutrition

Mindful Eating

About five years ago, I was in Paris for a week to celebrate my birthday. It was one of the happiest times of my life. As I strolled the streets of that breathtakingly beautiful city, it wasn’t just the stunning architecture, the carefully manicured gardens, or the twinkling lights of the Eiffel Tower that captured […]

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Posted on May 30th, 2013 by in Nutrition

Detox: What It Is and Why to do It

Cheryl Kain, guest blogger When I set out to learn more about detox, the first thing I discovered was that I had some outdated ideas, based on college days of enduring water fasts and repeated vows (always broken) to give up sugar. I wanted to debunk the idea of detox as deprivation, or something to […]

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Posted on December 18th, 2012 by in Nutrition

The Skinny on Fat: How Bad is Fat for Us—Really?

The total fail of the fat-free ’80s and ’90s taught us that fat isn’t perhaps the villain we made it out to be, and that following a low-fat diet not only isn’t the cure to obesity but also may actually make things worse. That’s because fat plays an important role in giving us energy, building […]

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Posted on November 16th, 2012 by in Ayurveda, Kripalu Kitchen

Breakfast, Ayurveda-Style

Even if you don’t consider yourself to be a morning person, there’s still much to love about those first few moments after you roll out of bed: In their stillness you can get ready to step into the day by organizing your thoughts, assessing your needs, and—when it comes to breakfast—nourishing your whole self.

As we’re all unique individuals and our bodies call for different things, there isn’t a formula for a breakfast that suits everyone. Instead, starting the day off right means understanding your body and digestion, and choosing what works for you. This tuning in is at the heart of what we teach at Kripalu, which can help point the way toward a breakfast that’s balanced with you in mind:

1. Heed your hunger. Not everyone can eat like a lumberjack first thing in the morning, so prepare the right-size meal for your body type. From the Ayurvedic perspective, for instance, those with more delicate constitutions (vata types) should have a warming but light meal, like simple hot cereal, while hardier folks who wake up hungry (pitta types) can handle things like eggs, nuts and seeds, and fruit.

2. Fresh is best. We all know the best breakfast comes from our own kitchens—so look for whole foods (grains, fruits, and vegetables) that you can easily prepare for yourself each morning to optimize their freshness. Meat, eggs, and dairy may also have their place on the breakfast table, but only if they arrive fresh from a trusted local source.

3. Stay on schedule. Get into the habit of having your breakfast at a regular time. The body tends to get attuned to things, and if you eat at 6:00 am one day and 10:00 am the next, that can throw off your digestive rhythms. (But you don’t need to eat the same thing every day. In fact, Ayurveda encourages eating seasonally, which ensures an ever-changing lineup of fruits and vegetables.)

4. Savor every bite. Ayurveda teaches that being in tune with your meal—from selecting and preparing it to quietly sitting with it and appreciating it—feeds far more than just your body. Breakfast is an ideal time to explore this practice, and discover that the more you create consciousness around what you’re putting into your body, the stronger and healthier your whole body-mind-spirit complex becomes.

 

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Posted on October 19th, 2012 by in Kripalu Kitchen, Nutrition

10 Principles of Nutritional Health

Here, at Kripalu, there are nutritional tenets that substantiate our approach to food. By applying these principles, you can enjoy your food in healthful ways that promote well-being.

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Digestive Health and Spirituality

What You Believe and How You Digest May Go Hand in Hand

In this excerpt from their book, The Inside Tract: Your Good Gut Guide to Great Digestive Health, Kripalu Nutritionist Kathie Madonna Swift, MS, RD, LDN, and coauthor Gerard E. Mullin share insights on how cultivating a spiritual practice can help you reduce stress, recover from illness, and lead a life of wellness.

Many studies have demonstrated a connection between spirituality and lower rates of stress and even depression. Maintaining a spiritual practice can help people cope better with stressful situations, thus reducing their anxiety levels and lessening the impact of chronic stress. Numerous researchers have documented a link between spirituality and depression: Spiritually healthy practices like finding meaning and purpose in life, having an intrinsic value system, and belonging to a supportive community with shared values may reduce depressive symptoms. Since stress and mood disorders such as anxiety and depression have such a profound impact on gut health, it stands to reason that engaging in a spiritual practice could have a positive impact on stress-related digestive disorders, too.

Harvard cardiologist Dr. Herbert Benson was one of the first to study the relationship between spirituality and health. He revolutionized the field by showing that meditating in a trancelike state reduces stress and improves health while simultaneously raising consciousness and spiritual awareness. Though his finding is still considered groundbreaking by many in the West, ancient cultures have integrated spirituality into healing for millennia. Shamanic priests were regarded as “healers” long before the development of pharmaceuticals, and meditation and prayer have been at the very center of healing practices since the dawn of time.

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