Tag Archives: faith
Posted on August 26th, 2013 by in Wake-Up Call

Right Where You’re Supposed To Be

A few years ago, I moved from Massachusetts to Oregon. I had convinced myself that, in order to find happiness, I first needed to find a better place to live. Though I didn’t realize it at the time, I was setting myself up for failure. Settling into a new city was hard work, not to […]

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Posted on July 16th, 2013 by in Meditation

The Power of Kindness

Sharon Salzberg, guest blogger In northeastern India, there is a town called Bodh Gaya, which formed around the tree the Buddha was sitting under when he became enlightened. In 1971, an 18-year-old New Yorker named Sharon Salzberg traveled to Bodh Gaya and took her first intensive meditation course. Motivated by “an intuition that the methods […]

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Posted on February 4th, 2013 by in Healthy Living

Developing Resiliency From Within

We often get caught up in thinking about what’s not working or what needs improving in our lives, especially when we face difficulties. This piece invites us to look within for hidden treasures and discover the amazing gifts we already have. Who can we become when we are at our most vulnerable? How do we […]

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Posted on May 23rd, 2012 by in Yoga

A Religious Experience

In yoga, one writer reconnects with the notion of faith.

Like most kids in my middle-class New England town, I was raised Catholic, though in my case it was something of a default option. My parents had both been brought up in religious households but, by the time I came along, they were largely non-practicing. My mother’s strict Irish-Catholic family—so devout (or stubborn) that they refused to acknowledge her secular college education—turned her away from the church, and my father, a journalist, had been trained to follow facts, not faith. While they wanted the decision of religion to be mine, they also sought to provide me with a base from which to explore, a base that would include Baptism, Confirmation, and 10 years of weekly after-school Catholic-education classes.

But while I made all the milestones, I neither connected with nor opposed their meanings. My given religion was never something to think about; it just was. Later, as a teenager, church on Sunday remained important to me mainly because to my parents it was not. (What a rebel, right?) But it wasn’t as if my friends were so pious: The annual Christmas-eve midnight mass was as much about socializing as it was about celebrating the birth of Jesus.

Throughout, no one I knew questioned what we’d been taught. We took the word of our teachers, and our priests, on “faith.” In those early years, “faith” meant believing that if you were a good person, good would surround you; that if you treated others well, you would be treated well in return; that if you followed the Catholic doctrine, you would be rewarded with peace while you lived and after you died. Faith, for the most part, did not include questioning authority. And, for a long time, I didn’t.

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