Tag Archives: fiber
Posted on November 29th, 2013 by in Kripalu Kitchen

Kripalu Recipe: Arugula Salad with Poached Pears, Walnuts, and Chevre with a Balsamic Fig Reduction

Another Boon for the Cardiovascular System. One of our favorite fall fruits is the pear. If you’re in the Northwest, you have a much better chance of visiting a pear orchard than here in New England. But whether they’re fresh picked or not, nothing beats a poached pear served with soft goat cheese, walnuts, arugula, [...]

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Posted on October 11th, 2013 by in Nutrition

The Food-Mood Connection

Does what you eat affect how you feel? Well, yes! As a nutritionist who, for more than two decades, has observed the degree and depth to which this connection makes itself clear—for those I work with every day, and in my own body—it’s obvious: What you eat impacts how you feel on the physical, energetic, [...]

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Posted on July 12th, 2013 by in Kripalu Kitchen, Nutrition

Kripalu Recipe: Thai Three-Melon Soup

Acid-Base Balance Naturally sweet summer dishes are filled with healthy fiber and other nutrients. But they have another nutritional benefit, too: they contribute to acid-alkaline balance. The acid-alkaline (or acid-base) principle has been gaining ground in the scientific community as an important guideline for preventive health. Maintaining a healthy acid-alkaline balance is thought to support [...]

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Posted on June 7th, 2013 by in Kripalu Kitchen

Kripalu Recipes: Grilled Summer Vegetables

If you’ve never put asparagus on your grill, don’t wait a moment longer to enjoy this amazing treat. Serves four to six. 1 bunch asparagus (remove hard ends) 1 zucchini, sliced or cut in chunks 1 summer squash, sliced or cut in chunks 1 onion, cut in large wedges 1 red pepper, cut in large [...]

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Posted on May 30th, 2013 by in Nutrition

Detox: What It Is and Why to do It

Cheryl Kain, guest blogger When I set out to learn more about detox, the first thing I discovered was that I had some outdated ideas, based on college days of enduring water fasts and repeated vows (always broken) to give up sugar. I wanted to debunk the idea of detox as deprivation, or something to [...]

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Posted on May 24th, 2013 by in Ayurveda, Kripalu Kitchen

Kripalu Dahl

This year we expanded our Buddha Bar to include fare inspired by Ayurveda, including a dahl (spiced bean dish) and a few chutneys, which have proven to be very popular, especially among our School of Ayurveda students. We love pouring the dahl over basmati rice and adding a little chutney on the side. Try making [...]

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Posted on December 28th, 2012 by in Kripalu Kitchen, Nutrition

The Nutritional Benefits of Grains

Grains have a wealth of benefits to offer, from fiber to plant proteins to phytonutrients and B vitamins. There is a caveat, however. You can only reap these benefits if you’re eating whole grains.

When grains are refined (a process in which the outer bran and inner germ are removed), they can be made into a wide variety of cheap foods that will last almost indefinitely, but deliver few nutrients. Refined grains act more like sugar in the body, which may make them easy to overeat. But as you make the switch to whole grains—and become more attuned to what real foods taste like—you can savor the fullness of a whole grain right down to the flavor of its germ. Your body, and your taste buds, will thank you.

You may have heard a lot about gluten lately, the protein responsible for the wonderful chewy texture of breads and other baked goods. It’s true that many people are sensitive to gluten, which has helped spark a deep exploration of gluten-free grains like millet and amaranth, and alternative sources for flour, like coconuts and garbanzo beans. But for the majority of us who digest gluten well, wheat, rye, and other whole grains with gluten remain a wonderfully healthful choice.

With a bit of inspiration and a willingness to get creative, it’s easy to tune into the allure of whole and gluten-free grains, and discover the ones you love best.

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Posted on November 10th, 2012 by in Nutrition

Find Peace from the Struggle to Maintain a Healthy Weight

Why do so many of us struggle to maintain a healthy weight? One of the top culprits, says integrative nutritionist Annie B. Kay, MS, RD, RYT, in her R&R retreat lecture A Natural Way to Healthy Weight, is the typical American diet, which is loaded with sugar, heavy on processed foods, and doesn’t include much fiber. One of the major factors in finding balance, Annie says, is to examine our choices and explore new options that could be more beneficial to our health—and waistlines—in the long run.

In order to maintain a healthy weight, Annie says, it’s necessary to first look at what’s on our plate. “Whole foods are healers,” Annie says. “They supply us with a sustained energy balance, unlike high-sugar, processed foods, which take our blood sugar on a roller coaster ride.” To help us foster this sustainable energy, Annie suggests shifting from a grain-based to a green-based diet, avoiding white flour and other simple carbs, and stocking our kitchen with foods high in nutrient density—foods packed with more nutrients per calorie, such as fruits and vegetables. Nutrient-dense foods also have the bonus of keeping us full longer.

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Posted on October 16th, 2012 by in Nutrition

Harvest Nutrition

Although most of the fruits and vegetables we associate with autumn are not related botanically, they offer our bodies a consistent nutritional theme. Apples, pears, grapes, beets, and squash are all excellent sources of soluble fiber and all but the squash are great sources of one particular type of soluble fiber: pectin. Pectin has a long list of research-substantiated health effects that range from lowering cholesterol levels to removing heavy metals and other contaminants from the body. This is truly nature’s soft detox agent and a great way to prepare for the short days of winter.

In addition to this great source of soluble fiber, these fruits and vegetables are very alkalizing as they are all great sources of potassium. They have unique phytonutrients that are protective against carcinogens. The ellagic acid in grapes and the betacyanin in beets stand out in this area, but winter squash varieties that cook to a dark orange are loaded with a wide variety of carotenoids that offer similar protection. Autumn makes it easy to eat the amount of fruits and vegetables that we need to feel our best.

What are your favorite autumn fruits or vegetables to eat? Share your recipes!

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