Tag Archives: Kripalu kitchen
Posted on March 8th, 2013 by in Kripalu Kitchen

Vegan Gravy and Buddha Sauce for Late-Winter Meals

By this time of year, we’re all ready for some warmth. Here at Kripalu, we serve a selection of tasty, healthy staples that keep everyone nourished through the winter. Many of these are available at our Buddha Bar, which provides macrobiotic and vegan options daily, including organic grains, steamed vegetables, and legumes. Here are two […]

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Posted on February 8th, 2013 by in Kripalu Kitchen

Kripalu House Dressing

The Kripalu House Dressing has been a guest favorite for years. Enjoy it over salads or steamed vegetables. Here, John Bagnulo, PhD, MPH, discusses the nutritional benefits of sesame tahini, a star ingredient in the Kripalu House Dressing: Sesame tahini provides an excellent source of copper—a trace mineral critical for the body’s production of its […]

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Posted on September 28th, 2012 by in Healthy Living, Kripalu Kitchen

Balancing: Applying Love Life Lessons to the Kitchen

My fiancé, Jim, and I recently participated in a wonderful program at Kripalu led by David Deida called The Sexual Body and the Yoga of Light. While we never talked about food or cooking during the program, I couldn’t help but draw some significant parallels. A large part of the discussions centered on recognizing and enhancing the natural polarities of masculine and feminine energies. We talked about what it’s like to have both strong and weakened states of polarity with our partners. For me, when the polarity was strong and we had a clear sense of openheartedness, the amount of vibrancy and energy between us felt most engaging and satisfying. When the polarity collapsed, or when it felt forced or came with an agenda (e.g. “I want something from you”), our energy felt unsatisfying.

After the program ended, it just so happed that I needed to go straight to the Kripalu Kitchen to cook a dinner for our Board of Trustees and our donors. As I pondered what to put in one of the appetizers and reflected on the program, I was reminded that cooking can simply be thought of as a dynamic dance of creating healthy polarity between foods.

The white halibut needed the richly colored charmoula sauce we drizzled on it. The Moroccan sauce, with its sharp cilantro and spicy paprika, needed the stabilizing flavor of the olive oil to balance it. The dense flourless chocolate cake was complemented by the light, citrusy whipped cream. And the list of how we used polarized flavors, textures, and ingredients went on.

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