Tag Archives: loving-kindness
Posted on August 24th, 2013 by in Meditation, Wake-Up Call

The Ability to Be With What Is

The Heart of a Revolution A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to study with Noah Levine, the original maverick Dharma Punk, founder of the Buddhist community Against the Stream, and iconoclastic promoter of compassion, authenticity, and joy. Noah began the daylong intensive at Kripalu by discussing his background and practice. As I listened, […]

read →
Posted on August 21st, 2013 by in Outside Our Walls

Elevating Consciousness: The 2013 Yoga Service Conference

Wayne Nato, guest blogger The Yoga Service Conference, held this past June at Omega Institute in Rhinebeck, New York, brought together leading teachers and organizations who are using yoga and mindfulness practices to help people in underserved communities change their lives. The conference is a unique and intimate opportunity to forge relationships, build skills, and get inspired. This […]

read →
Posted on December 31st, 2012 by in Meditation

Balancing Act: A Conversation with Jack Kornfield

Meditation Lets Us Look Inside Ourselves to See the Whole World

Jack Kornfield, PhD, is a clinical psychologist, author, and one of the most well-known teachers of Buddhism in the West. He’s a founding teacher of the Insight Meditation Society in Barre, Massachusetts, and Spirit Rock Center in California. Here, he talks about meditation, his signature loving-kindness practice, an upcoming Kripalu retreat, and why he loves to teach.

What’s at the core of the trainings you teach? 
The trainings are centered in equanimity and balance—it’s the training of the heart and mind to stay balanced. I teach a series of steps for equanimity, beginning with reflections on the vastness of time and changing circumstances, ever-changing winds of gain and loss, praise and loss, pleasure and pain. Training has to do with reflecting on the value of keeping a peaceful heart and envisioning others with compassion. We realize that people can love enormously, and that you can’t love on behalf of someone else; we try to understand the limits of love. It’s also using a series of deep intentions: May I live with peace in the joys and sorrows of the world. May you find peace.

read →