Tag Archives: restorative yoga
Posted on November 17th, 2015 by in Conscious Living, Healthy Living, Meditation, Yoga

Slow Down: Restoring Pathways to Connection

by Jess Frey There is more to life than increasing its speed. —Mohandas K. Gandhi Go-go-go. More-more-more. Faster-harder-better. We live in a culture of speed and disconnect—disconnect from self, others, and the world around us, which gradually takes us away from the natural rhythms and cycles of our body, nature, and life. Conditions such as […]

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Posted on October 19th, 2015 by in Ask the Expert, Teachers Corner, Yoga

Rest, Relax, Renew: The Benefits of Restorative Yoga

A Q&A with Sudha Carolyn Lundeen Sudha Carolyn Lundeen teaches Restorative Yoga Teacher Training at Kripalu January 8–17, the first program in our new Yoga Teacher Specialist Training. We asked her about the benefits of restorative yoga and how teachers can use this skill to enhance their yoga business. What does a Specialist-level training offer […]

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Posted on July 26th, 2014 by in Yoga

Earth, Water, Fire, Air, Ether—and Yoga

by Julie Balter I don’t know about you, but it doesn’t take much for me to feel out of balance. Sure, I have a regular yoga practice (most of the time). Yes, I eat healthy, breath mindfully, and meditate deeply (some of the time). Over the years, I’ve also experimented with Ayurveda, acupuncture, and daily […]

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Posted on March 20th, 2014 by in Conscious Living

Yoga Nidra: The All-Natural Sleep Aid

Sleep. While it seems about as natural as breathing, for 50 to 70 million Americans, it isn’t. Intermittent and chronic sleep problems are rampant and can potentially affect alertness, safety, and health. For some, medications or a medical condition could be interfering with sleep; for others, too much sugar or caffeine could be the culprit. […]

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Posted on February 24th, 2014 by in Yoga

Yoga to Harmonize with the Season

by Jillian Pransky Winter is nature’s time of hibernation, retreat, and contraction. As winter’s cold, wet, dark, and heavy qualities increase around us, they grow within us as well. Winter demands that we move inward for rest and replenishment, just as the earth stops producing in order to build a new reserve and be bountiful […]

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Posted on July 13th, 2013 by in Ayurveda

The Season of Pitta

According to Ayurveda, India’s system of traditional medicine, each season has its own group of qualities, and each quality has its antidote. Ayurvedic technology is based on being in relationship to yourself and the environment through the lens of these qualities. The changing of the seasons gives us an ongoing opportunity to be in relationship […]

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Posted on October 20th, 2012 by in Life Lessons, Yoga

Rituals of Transition: A Shamanic Approach to Moving Beyond Fear and Anxiety

by Bo Forbes According to clinical psychologist and yoga therapist Bo Forbes, the best tactic for overcoming fear and anxiety is to run toward them rather than away. What do we do once we catch up with our fears? As Bo explains in this article, the wisdom of tribal societies can offer a context and […]

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Posted on September 12th, 2012 by in Healthy Living, Life Lessons

Moving Forward After Cancer

A cancer survivor explores bold new directions

When I plopped into the Radiance program’s opening night welcome circle, I was exhausted. That morning, I had attended the memorial service for my dear friend, Dara, who had passed a week before. A couple hundred people gathered to share stories, laughter, tears, and outrage that this beautiful, lively, loving soul had left at age 40, from cancer.

And now, a train ride and time warp later, here I was in the branch-filled Berkshires, sitting in a back jack, meeting eight cancer survivors and our co-leader Maria Sirois. In that moment, “life after cancer” looked to me like throwing a rose on my friend’s coffin and hearing it thud. It looked like crying myself to sleep every night for the last two weeks.

But as I settled in and heard tales of diagnosis and survival, I remembered: Oh. We’re all still here. In my fellow workshoppers—eight people from their 30s through 50s—I saw stress and fear and bravery and resilience and resistance. I saw myself. Diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma seven years ago at age 31, I had almost been forgetting that I was a survivor, too.

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